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Pædagogisk Psykologisk Tidsskrift
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DE SENESTE NUMRE » 40.årgang - 2003 » 40.årgang nr.4 September 2003 Rummelighed, KVIS og PPR
 
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Kim Foss Hansen

Hvad er det, vi ser i KVIS?

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Hansen, Kim Foss (Consultant in the Ministry of Education). What do we see in the KVIS Program? Pædagogisk Psykologisk Rådgivning, 2003, Vol. 40, 4, 371-384. – While all aims of the program haven’t yet been attained, significant effects have been made: wide-spread involvement, discussions at the political levels, improvements of school management, a more inclusive school, early prevention of school failure, improvement of the school psychological work etc. And perhaps most important of all: while the aims of he program was to ensure and develop the quality of extensive special education there is now a much wider perspective: the quality of teaching in normal as well as special education. – B. Glæsel
Ole Hansen

Forord

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Hansen, Ole (Consultant in the Ministry of Education). The Work in the KVIS Program. Pædagogisk Psykologisk Rådgivning, 2003, Vol. 40, 4, 363-370. – The KVIS program (Quality in Special Education) was commenced as a consequence of a new bill in 2000, transferring the decision whether a pupil should receive extensive special education from the county council to the municipality level. So far a great number of conferences have been held, and many developmental projects have been launched, involving politicians, parents, teachers, psychologists etc. All in all these activities have raised the level of special education in Denmark. – B. Glæsel
Finn Christensen

Danmark, et godt sted for mennesker med særlige behov

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Christensen, Finn (County school psychologist in the county of Viborg). Denmark, a Good Place for People with Special Needs. Pædagogisk Psykologisk Rådgivning, 2003, Vol. 40, 4, 385-389. – Relating a number of foreign visits to Viborg, the author reflects on a number of questions and suggestions about special education, made by the visitors. Hong Kong visitors were impressed by the effects, but suggested more precise goals and tests to document progress. Bulgarian visitors wondered shy so many resources were spent on retarded pupils. Scotch visitors were impressed by the high level of local autonomy. Lithuanian visitors found a rising tendency to segregate handicapped pupils into special schools. Discussions in Nepal showed hat they were amazed that we teach handicapped children at all. These contributions have served well in the local discussions. – B. Glæsel
Bengt Persson

Dokumentation över särskilt stöd

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Persson, Bengt (Professor at the University of Gothenburg). Documentation of Special Support. Pædagogisk Psykologisk Rådgivning, 2003, Vol. 40, 4, 390-402. – In many countries requirements of documentation of special needs have been instituted for years. In Sweden this happened in 1974, and the demands have been intensified in 2001. This is similar to the 2001 UNESCO goal: Open file on Inclusive Education. In Sweden an investigation of 10 schools was performed comprising 114 interviews, 83 files, and 60 hours of observation. Analyzing his findings, the author grouped the schools as proactive or reactive, the characteristics of the proactive schools being: much PTA work, commitment from the teachers, good routines for planning, documentation and evaluation etc., and a leadership being visible but not authoritarian. In such schools a pupil file becomes not only a prescription of special education, but a document furthering the well being of the pupil. – B. Glæsel
Niels Egelund

PPR og fremtidens socialpædagogiske indsats

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Egelund, Niels (Professor at the Danish Pedagogical University). The School Psychological Services and the Future of Special Education. Pædagogisk Psykologisk Rådgivning, 2003, Vol. 40, 4, 403-409. – The tasks of school psychological offices can be classified as must- or may-tasks. The legislation demands pedagogical psychological assessment of pupils and proposals of special education. In most areas, however, the offices have taken on a number of other tasks such as preventive measures, developmental projects, and supervision and consultation of teachers. A recently published report on special education in Denmark shows a marked difference between schools as to the percentage of pupils receiving special education. These differences put an extra obligation on the offices to be critical about their own efforts. There seems to be a need to employ persons with new qualifications beside the traditional psychologists. – B. Glæsel
Pia Guttorm Andersen & Kjeld Fredens

Pædagogisk teknologi

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Guttorm, Pia & Fredens, Kjeld. Computers in Education. Pædagogisk Psykologisk Rådgivning, 2003, Vol. 40, 4, 410-416. – The programs dealing with reading and writing may be grouped in three: standard programs, support programs and supportive tools. Pupils with reading problems need digital texts, internet access and intranet access. Pupils with writing problems need at least three different tests: spontaneous writing, dictation, and copying. The Levi-Strauss concept, bricolage, is found useful, meaning someone working with his hands after different principles than those of a craftsman. Bricolage is an important access to information technology, but not easily acquired of teachers having been brought up to have everything explained first. – B. Glæsel
Thomas Nordahl

Elevens stemme

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Nordahl, Thomas (Researcher in the Nova Project). The Voice of the Pupil. Pædagogisk Psykologisk Rådgivning, 2003, Vol. 40, 4, 417-433. – If we are to understand the pupil we must acquire insight into his reality concepts, his wishes, and his values. This position puts demands on the teachers and has some pedagogical consequences. Understanding the pupil as a prerequisite of changing his behaviour; understanding and correcting the social relationships between pupils; development of positive relationships between pupil and teacher; furthering the pupil’s self understanding; understanding the acts of pupil and teacher; confronting individual causal explanations. – B. Glæsel
Hannah Fjældstad

PPR som løftestang eller dødvægt?

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Fjældstad, Hannah (Chief consultant in the National Association of Local authorities in Denmark). School Psychology as a Lever or a Dead Weight. Pædagogisk Psykologisk Rådgivning, 2003, Vol. 40, 4, 434-440 – There are many prerequisites for a development of an inclusive school. Some of these pertain directly to the school psychological services. If more children are to profit from teaching in normal classes, school psychologists should change focus from studying the individual child to the relations in the classroom. If new structures are introduced in the school, school psychologists should upgrade coaching and supervision of teachers. If technology and tools in teaching change, school psychologists should focus on the development of competences. If the roles of pupils, teachers and heads change, school psychologists should develop strategies to participate in the new relationships. – B. Glæsel
Bent B. Andresen

Efteruddannelse der gør en forskel

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Andersen, Bent B. In-Service Training that Makes a Difference. Pædagogisk Psykologisk Rådgivning, 2003, Vol. 40, 4, 441-443. – One of the main issues of the KVIS program is in-service training of teachers. A large number of training courses have been established over a wide range of subjects. – B. Glæsel
Ole Hansen

Casestudy over den vidtgående specialundervisning i to regioner – april 2003

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Hansen, Ole (Consultant for the Ministry of Education and former Chief School Psychologist). A Case-Study of Extensive Special Education in Two Regions. April 2003. Pædagogisk Psykologisk Rådgivning, 2003, Vol. 40, 4, 444-462. – As a part of the evaluation of the KVIS program four municipalities and two counties were asked to describe their special education in interviews. The transfer of decisions to give a pupil extensive special education from the county to the municipal level has not been an entire success. One of the reasons seems to be the charge that the municipality must pay to the county in each case (176,000 Danish Crowns). The charge should be raised considerably in order to stimulate new solutions in the municipality to special educational needs. However, large municipalities are much better prepared to keep their pupils at home in the municipality than smaller ones. The differences mirror divergent local assumptions and values: Why shall a pupil be moved to a county special school? How should the municipality act? Should the efforts be of a compensatory or a democratic participant nature? Etc. – B. Glæsel
Lars Qvortrup

Barnets hverdagskompetener: Den rummelige skole og det rollekompetente barn

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Quortrup, Lars (Professor at the University of Southern Denmark and director of Learning Lab). The Everyday Competence of the Child. The Inclusive School and the Role Competent Child. Pædagogisk Psykologisk Rådgivning, 2003, Vol. 40, 4, 463-471. – The concept of an inclusive elementary school has many aspects, comprising a.o. social background, intelligence, learning styles, and ethnicity of the children. At the same time it is important that the school stimulates different role competences in the children. Five roles are suggested: family child role where the medium is love and the function to be loved; pupil role, where the medium is teaching and the function to acquire skills and be seen as competent; street and club role, where the medium is power and the function to master; friend role, the medium being trust and the function to develop trust; organization role, the medium being membership and the function to maintain membership. The child who masters transformations between these roles may be said to have everyday competence. Such a child is an inclusive child. – B. Glæsel
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